Monday, April 6, 2009

Review: J. Herbin Lie De The Fountain Pen Ink

J. Herbin Lie De The

From the J Herbin website:

"J. Herbin is the oldest name in pen inks in the world. M. Herbin created “The Jewel of Inks” in his shop on the Rue des Fosses Saint-Germain in Paris in 1700."

"Each bottle of 30 ml has an integrated pen rest. They are known as “D bottle pen inks. The “D” refers to the old French unit of measure “la Demi Courtine”.

* 30 beautiful colors!
* Non toxic and pH neutral
* Lightfast
* Water based
* Flows smoothly and is fast drying
* All natural dyes

J. Herbin Lie De The

When I tested this ink as I usually do, I tried it on two different kinds of paper. One with a smooth surface and one that was more absorbent. But unlike most other times I test ink, I tried it in a medium nibbed wet writing Sapporo. With the Sapporo, I found the ink to be moderately saturated, and with excellent flow. Since I didn't care for the color, (a brown that's too yellow for my tastes) I hadn't intended to use it again, and so my initial experience was left to stand... until I decided to give it one more chance and filled a new EF Lamy Safari with it.

Unlike the two images found here, the EF Safari laid down a much thinner, dryer line. It didn't look as saturated, and the color was much lighter.

And that's the thing about ink, and pens, and paper. Your mileage is going to vary, depending on ALL three variables. Not just one or another. It's not uncommon for an ink to appear lighter or darker depending on your chosen nib size. The paper you choose will also affect your results. It's a lot of trial and error, hit and miss. Lucky thing there is a wonderful community over at the Fountain Pen Network that is more than happy to trade or buy inks that you thought you would love but don't.

J. Herbin Lie De The

I noted that I had a hard time describing the color of this ink. It's a yellowish-brown, and if you wipe your nib on a tissue, you will see halos of orange. Someone told me that they see the color as coffee before you put cream in it. In any event, it's not one that speaks to me. I personally find it to be a muddy color - a mix that doesn't seem to know what it wants to be.

Herbin inks run $7.20 per 30ml bottle at The Ink Flow

11 comments:

Gentian said...

It looks like a black tea colour to me :) or like a sepia toned photograph. I like the look of it. Thanks for testing it, I think I would like to try that one sometime.

Anonymous said...

I have this color and I like it. Good review, with beautiful handwriting---and that pic of the bottle is just cool. -Kenshin

Notebook Stories said...

The name "Lie de The" seems to translate to "Link to Tea" or something like that, so I guess tea is the color they're aiming for-- but to me that would mean it should be more reddish.

Notebook Stories said...

And, duh, I just noticed the label has a teapot on it!

Anonymous said...

I think the color name should be translated as tea leaf or leaves.

Anonymous said...

I think the best translation for "lie de thé" would be "dregs of tea."

Den Lim said...

I like this color of ink. It doesn't bleed with my lamy.
I think of this color as old tea stains. good for making antique aged looking sketches

Den Lim said...

I like this color of ink. It doesn't bleed with my lamy.
I think of this color as old tea stains. good for making antique aged looking sketches

SakiVI said...

I really thought I'd love this ink, since I like interesting browns. But when i tried it, all I could think was, diarrhea. So I gave a nearly new bottle to Goodwill...

Clemnz said...

Bought this ink - it comes out tea brown / gold in my Italix fine italic nib. Awesome colour. Very distinct.

Clemnz said...

Love this colour. Very elegant - looks cross between dark tea brown / old gold. Use an Italix, with a fine italic nib.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...